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Please visit this page to clear all LQ-related cookies. Introduction to Linux - A Hands on Guide This guide was created as an overview of the Linux Operating System, geared toward new users as an exploration tour and getting started guide, with exercises at the end of each chapter. For more advanced trainees it can be a desktop reference, and a collection of the base knowledge needed to proceed with system and network administration.

simple scan linux wifi

This book contains many real life examples derived from the author's experience as a Linux system and network administrator, trainer and consultant. They hope these examples will help you to get a better understanding of the Linux system and that you feel encouraged to try out things on your own.

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Last edited by sdowney; at AM. I tried to print to it and nothing, so somehow it lost its config in ubunut just like that The printer is connected by wifi to the router. I deleted the printer and redetected the printer using cups, the other add printer dialog in 'printers' in apps, always gives tons of printers mx series.

At least cups only puts up one mx series printer in to the list. So anyway, it detects and sets it up, but nothing can print! It used to work, then suddeny died during a scan and has not worked since. I decided to turn the printer off, then turn it on, and everything printed. WHY did it need to be turned off in order to work?

Thread Tools. BB code is On. Smilies are On. All times are GMT Privacy Terms. For help, knowledge, and fellowship. Skip to content. Search Advanced search. Quick links. Scanner problems with Simple scan. Forum rules There are no such things as "stupid" questions. However if you think your question is a bit stupid, then this is the right place for you to post it.

Please stick to easy to-the-point questions that you feel people can answer fast.

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For long and complicated questions prefer the other forums within the support section. Before you post please read how to get help. Post Reply. Simple Scan recognizes it, butwhen I scan a few images, the program freezes, shuts down, stops working, hangs, etc. I tried dpi, dpi, 12,dpi and 24,dpi. All of them do it. I don't care about a high dpi taking a long time, this is testing. Is this because I am live booting from a DVD? I am thinking it is related to a printer problem I am having. Is it required to do a re-boot and full shut-down when updating and installing repositories?

I read this page, this doesn't seem to be the problem. Last edited by SyncroScales on Mon Aug 07, am, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Scanner problems with Simple scan. It would help to know more about your system setup. If you run " inxi -Fxzd " from the console terminal prompt, highlight the results, copy and paste them back here, that should provide enough information.

The scanning issues might be due to you running from a Live installation version of Linux Mint where you cannot really save anything because it is read only. There are a few really great scanning options, including 'gscan2pdf", and others. Hope this helps Phd21 : Mint I use KDE?

You have to run it from terminal, but it will do the search and hopefully setup of a scanner for you. All things go better with Mint.Jump to navigation. Whether you're moving to a paperless lifestyle, need to scan a document to back it up or email it, want to scan an old photo, or whatever reason you have for making the physical electronic, a scanner comes in handy.

In fact, a scanner is essential.

simple scan linux wifi

But the catch is that most scanner makers don't have Linux versions of the software that they bundle with their devices.

For the most part, that doesn't matter. Because there are good scanning applications available for the Linux desktop. They work with a variety of scanners, and do a good job. Our latest Linux articles. Let's take a look at a three simple but flexible Linux scanning tools. Keep in mind that the software discussed below is hardly an exhaustive list of the scanner software that's available for the Linux desktop.

It's what I've used extensively and found useful. First up, Simple Scan. It's the default scanner application for Ubuntu and its derivatives like Linux Mint.

Simple Scan is easy to use and packs a few useful features. That said, Simple Scan can be slow, even if you scan documents at lower resolutions. On top of that, Simple Scan uses a set of global defaults for scanning, like dpi for text and dpi for photos.

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You need to go into Simple Scan's preferences to change those settings. Next up, gscan2pdf.

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It packs a few more features than Simple Scan but it's still comparatively light. Unlike Simple Scan, gscan2pdf allows you to set the resolution of what you're scanning, whether it's black and white or colour, and paper size of your scan before you click the button.

simple scan linux wifi

Those aren't killer features, but they give you a bit more flexibility. You probably know it as an image editing tool. When you scan with The GIMP, you not only get the opportunity to set a number of options for example, whether it's color or black and white, the resolution of the scan, and whether or not to compress resultsyou can also use The GIMP's tools to touch up or apply effects to your scans.Joinsubscribers and get a daily digest of news, geek trivia, and our feature articles.

You might be surprised. Learn how to check using nmap on Linux, which will let you explore all the devices connected to your network.

simple scan linux wifi

Depending on what other software packages you have installed on your computer, nmap might be installed for you already. You can install it on other versions of Linux using the package manager for your Linux distributions. The first task is to discover what the IP address of your Linux computer is. There is a minimum and a maximum IP address your network can use. This is the scope or range of IP addresses for your network.

We will need to provide IP addresses or a range of IP addresses to nmapso we need to know what those values are. Handily, Linux provides a command called ip and it has an option called addr address. In the bottom section of the output, you will find your ip address. The subnet mask and the IP address are used to indicate which part of the IP address identifies the network, and which part identifies the device.

This subnet mask informs the hardware that the first three numbers of the IP address will identify the network and the last part of the IP address identifies the individual devices. And because the largest number you can hold in an 8-bit binary number isthe IP address range for this network will be Happily, nmap works with that notation, so we have what we need to start to use nmap.

It can deduce a lot about the device it is probing by judging and interpreting the type of responses it gets. This tells nmap to not probe the ports on the devices for now.

It will do a lightweight, quick scan. Even so, it can take a little time for nmap to run. Of course, the more devices you have on the network, the longer it will take. It does all of its probing and reconnaissance work first and then presents its findings once the first phase is complete. That is the first possible IPAddress on this network.

Without sudo this scan would not return the manufacturer information, for example. The advantage of using the -sn option—as well as being a quick and lightweight scan—is it gives you a neat list of the live IP addresses.

In other words, we have a list of the devices connected to the network, together with their IP address. And where possible, nmap has identified the manufacturer. There are 15 devices switched on and connected to the network. We know the manufacturer for some of them. Or, as we shall see, we have what nmap has reported as the manufacturer, to the best of its ability. When you look through your results, you will likely see devices that you recognize. These are the ones we need to investigate further.

What some of these devices are is clear to me.

LinSSID: Graphical Wifi Scanner for Ubuntu and Linux Mint

Raspberry Pi Foundation is self-explanatory. The Amazon Technologies device will be my Echo Dot. The only Samsung device I have is a laser printer, so that narrows that one down.More people than ever are using wireless networks as their primary networking medium. Great programs are available under X11 that give users a graphical interface to their wireless cards. But, what if you aren't running X11 and want to manage your wireless card? I don't cover how to install and activate your card here for that, take a look at projects like madwifi or ndiswrapper.

I assume your card is installed and configured properly, and that it is called wlan0. Most of the utilities mentioned below need to talk directly to your wireless card or at least the card driverso they need to be run with root privileges just remember to use sudo.

The first step is to see what wireless networks are available in your area. A utility called iwlist provides all sorts of information about your wireless environment. To scan your environment for available networks, do the following:.

The details address and essid have been changed to protect the guilty. Also, the You will get a separate cell entry for each access point within your wireless card's range. For each access point, you can find the hardware address, the essid and the channel on which it's operating. Also, you can learn in what mode the access point is operating whether master or ad hoc.

Usually, you will be most interested in the essid and what encryption is being used. Once you know what's available in your immediate environment, configure your wireless card to use one of these access points using the iwconfig utility to set the parameters for your wireless card.

First, set the essid, which identifies the network access point you want:. In this case, your card will pick the first available access point.

This is called promiscuous mode. You also may need to set the mode to be used by your wireless card.Jump to navigation.

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While the paperless world isn't here quite yet, more and more people are getting rid of paper by scanning documents and photos. Having a scanner isn't enough to do the deed, though. You need software to drive that scanner.

LinSSID: Graphical Wifi Scanner for Ubuntu and Linux Mint

Our latest Linux articles But the catch is many scanner makers don't have Linux versions of the software they bundle with their devices. For the most part, that doesn't matter. Because there are good scanning applications available for the Linux desktop.

They work with a variety of scanners and do a good job.

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Let's take a look at four simple but flexible open source Linux scanning tools. I've used each of these tools and even wrote about three of them back in and found them very useful. You might, too. One of my longtime favorites, Simple Scan is small, quick, efficient, and easy to use. If you've seen it before, that's because Simple Scan is the default scanner application on the GNOME desktop, as well as for a number of Linux distributions.

Scanning a document or photo takes one click. That said, Simple Scan can be slow, even if you scan documents at lower resolutions. On top of that, Simple Scan uses a set of global defaults for scanning, like dpi for text and dpi for photos. You need to go into Simple Scan's preferences to change those settings. If you've scanned something with more than a couple of pages, you can reorder the pages before you save. And if necessary—say you're submitting a signed form—you can email from within Simple Scan.

Skanlite has few features, but it gets the job done nicely. The software has options that you can configure, including automatically saving scanned files, setting the quality of the scan, and identifying where to save your scans. One nifty feature is the software's ability to save portions of what you've scanned to separate files.

That comes in handy when, say, you want to excise someone or something from a photo.Jump to navigation. Whether you're moving to a paperless lifestyle, need to scan a document to back it up or email it, want to scan an old photo, or whatever reason you have for making the physical electronic, a scanner comes in handy.

In fact, a scanner is essential. But the catch is that most scanner makers don't have Linux versions of the software that they bundle with their devices. For the most part, that doesn't matter. Because there are good scanning applications available for the Linux desktop. They work with a variety of scanners, and do a good job. Our latest Linux articles. Let's take a look at a three simple but flexible Linux scanning tools. Keep in mind that the software discussed below is hardly an exhaustive list of the scanner software that's available for the Linux desktop.

It's what I've used extensively and found useful. First up, Simple Scan. It's the default scanner application for Ubuntu and its derivatives like Linux Mint.

Simple Scan is easy to use and packs a few useful features. That said, Simple Scan can be slow, even if you scan documents at lower resolutions. On top of that, Simple Scan uses a set of global defaults for scanning, like dpi for text and dpi for photos. You need to go into Simple Scan's preferences to change those settings. Next up, gscan2pdf. It packs a few more features than Simple Scan but it's still comparatively light. Unlike Simple Scan, gscan2pdf allows you to set the resolution of what you're scanning, whether it's black and white or colour, and paper size of your scan before you click the button.

Those aren't killer features, but they give you a bit more flexibility. You probably know it as an image editing tool. When you scan with The GIMP, you not only get the opportunity to set a number of options for example, whether it's color or black and white, the resolution of the scan, and whether or not to compress resultsyou can also use The GIMP's tools to touch up or apply effects to your scans.

This makes it perfect for scanning photos and art. The software discussed above works well for the most part and with a variety of hardware. They've even worked with a Fujitsu ScanSnap scanner. You might have noticed that I wrote works well for the most part in the previous paragraph. I did run into one exception: an inexpensive Canon multifunction printer. I had to download and install Canon's Linux scanner software, which did work.


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